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This is my eleventh entry for Sunshine’s Macro Monday. Here’s the link to Irene’s blog https://sunshinesmacromonday.net/2019/12/30/sunshines-macro-monday-22/

The Rules:

Sunshine’s Macro Monday is a one day challenge without prompts.  Irene will post a Sunshine’s Macro Monday post each week. Title your post however you like but use the tag SMM and mention Sunshine’s Macro Monday somewhere on your post.  Create a pingback or add a link in the comment section of that week’s post.  Post one or several photos each Monday.  Got questions?  Leave a comment with your question and I will get back to you as soon as possible.

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Delosperma cooperi (syn. Mesembryanthemum cooperi; common names Trailing Iceplant, Hardy Iceplant, or “Pink Carpet”) is a dwarf perennial plant, native to South Africa. It forms a dense lawn with abundant, long-lasting flowering. It will reach sizes of approximately 10–15 cm (4–6 in) tall, with fleshy leaves and a trailing stem that hangs down.

The flowers are the most brilliant aspect of this plant, with the production of a great quantity of vermillion, magenta or pink flowers that will often cover the entire site, hence the popular name “pink carpet”. The plant contains ramified stems that are spread out, carrying sheets opposed, and are long and narrow, with the end of the stems increasing into a quantity of isolated small flowers, with diameters ranging from 3 to 5 cm (1 to 2 in). These abundant and long-lasting flowers will remain in bloom from July to September. The plant is sun-loving, and thrives well in very dry and hot environments. While it adapts well to various soil types, it will suffer under water stagnation, and thus prefers well drained soils, or even rocky terrain.

According to the New Mexico State University extension, the common name, “ice plant” is because “they have bladder-like hairs on the leaf surface that reflect and refract light in a manner to make it appear that they sparkle like ice crystals” (or tiny glass beads). However, many other species of succulent so-called “ice plant” ground covers have smooth and hairless leaves.

Climbing roses can form a vibrant landscape backdrop for border perennials and annuals. They are also a lovely choice for arbors, trellises, fences, and pergolas. Most varieties will grow from 6- to 12-feet long and will spread about 3- to 4-feet wide. They are available in a range of pastels, brights, and multi-colors.

Climbers are considerably less fussy than their bush-form rose cousins; you simply need to have a handle on the basics and a little help from Mother Nature.

Most climbing roses (hybrid teas) bloom two or more times every season: first on old canes, and then on the current season’s growth. If you prune in late winter (about the time forsythia blooms), you’ll get boatloads of blooms later in the season. For old-fashioned climbers that only bloom once in the summer, prune just after blooming has stopped.

The acrobats of the rose world, the varieties of climbing roses develop long canes well adapted to training on pillars, fences, arbors, and gazebos. Most climbing roses are mutations or variations of bush-type varieties. They develop either large, single flowers or clustered blooms on a stem. Climbers may bloom once a season or continually, depending on the variety. Climbers can be treated to bloom more heavily by leading their canes in a horizontal direction. Loose anchoring to a support will encourage young plants to climb.