This is my second challenge. Seeing that there is no challenge on fruits I decided to start one. Fruits are one of the things that we humans need to eat in order to live a balanced life.

How Does It Work?

This Fruit of the Day challenge is a daily challenge.

Be creative and challenge yourself.

Last but not least, ENJOY and have FUN.

Create a Yummy Fruit of the Day post

  1. Then add a link to your blog in my comment box.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos and post, title your blog post “Queen Nandini’s Yummy Fruit of the Day Challenge” or “YFOTD” tag.
  3. Remember to Follow My Blog to get your weekly reminders.

I usually will respond to your entry on your blog, rather than on my page.

Still have questions? Please Contact Me

The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical plant with an edible fruit, also called a pineapple, and the most economically significant plant in the family Bromeliaceae. 

Pineapples may be cultivated from the offset produced at the top of the fruit, possibly flowering in five to ten months and fruiting in the following six months. Pineapples do not ripen significantly after harvest. In 2016, Costa Rica, Brazil, and the Philippines accounted for nearly one-third of the world’s production of pineapples.

The word “pineapple” in English was first recorded to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones). When European explorers encountered this tropical fruit in the Americas, they called them “pineapples” (first referenced in 1664, for resemblance to pine cones).

In the scientific binomial Ananas comosus, ananas, the original name of the fruit, comes from the Tupi Word nanas, meaning “excellent fruit”, as recorded by André Thevet in 1555, and comosus, “tufted”, refers to the stem of the fruit. Other members of the genus Ananas are often called pine, as well, in other languages.

The plant is indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between southern Brazil and Paraguay; however, little is known about the origin of the domesticated pineapple (Pickersgill, 1976). MS Bertoni (1919) considered the Paraná–Paraguay River drainages to be the place of origin of A. comosusThe natives of southern Brazil and Paraguay spread the pineapple throughout South America, and it eventually reached the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico, where it was cultivated by the Mayas and the Aztecs. Columbus encountered the pineapple in 1493 on the leeward island of Guadeloupe. He called it piña de Indes, meaning “pine of the Indians”, and brought it back with him to Spain, thus making the pineapple the first bromeliad to be introduced by humans outside of the New World. The Spanish introduced it into the Philippines, Hawaii (introduced in the 18th century, first commercial plantation 1886), Zimbabwe, and Guam. The Portuguese took the fruit from Brazil and introduced it into India by 1550.

The flesh and juice of the pineapple are used in cuisines around the world. In many tropical countries, pineapple is prepared and sold on roadsides as a snack. It is sold whole or in halves with a stick inserted. Whole, cored slices with a cherry in the middle are a common garnish on hams in the West. Chunks of pineapple are used in desserts such as fruit salad, as well as in some savory dishes, including pizza toppings, or as a grilled ring on a hamburger. Traditional dishes that use pineapple include hamonado, afritada, kaeng som pla, and Hawaiian haystack. Crushed pineapple is used in yogurt, jam, sweets, and ice cream. The juice of the pineapple is served as a beverage, and it is also the main ingredient in cocktails such as the piña colada and in the drink tepache.

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