Tags

This is my second challenge. Seeing that there is no challenge on fruits I decided to start one. Fruits are one of the things that we humans need to eat in order to live a balanced life.

How Does It Work?

This Fruit of the Day challenge is a daily challenge.

Be creative and challenge yourself.

Last but not least, ENJOY and have FUN.

Create a Yummy Fruit of the Day post

  1. Then add a link to your blog in my comment box.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos and post, title your blog post “Queen Nandini’s Yummy Fruit of the Day Challenge” or “YFOTD” tag.
  3. Remember to Follow My Blog to get your weekly reminders.

I usually will respond to your entry on your blog, rather than on my page.

Still have questions? Please Contact Me

An apricot is a fruit, or the tree that bears the fruit, of several species in the genus Prunus (stone fruits).

Usually, an apricot tree is from the species P. armeniaca, but the species P. brigantina, P. mandshurica, P. mume, P. zhengheensis and P. sibirica are closely related, have similar fruit, and are also called apricots.

Apricot first appeared in English in the 16th century as abrecock from the Middle French, aubercot, or later from Portuguese, albricoque. The scientific name armeniaca was first used by Gaspard Bauhin in his Pinax Theatri Botanici (1623), referring to the species as Mala armeniaca “Armenian apple”. Linnaeus took up Bauhin’s epithet in the first edition of his Species Plantarum in 1753, Prunus armeniaca.

The fruit is a drupe similar to a small peach, 1.5–2.5 cm (0.6–1.0 in) diameter (larger in some modern cultivars), from yellow to orange, often tinged red on the side most exposed to the sun; its surface can be smooth (botanically described as: glabrous) or velvety with very short hairs (botanically: pubescent). The flesh is usually firm and not very juicy. Its taste can range from sweet to tart. The single seed is enclosed in a hard, stony shell, often called a “stone” or “kernel”, with a grainy, smooth texture except for three ridges running down one side.

The origin of the apricot is disputed; it was known in Armenia during ancient times, and has been cultivated there for so long that it is often thought to have originated there. Despite the great number of varieties of apricots that are grown in Armenia today (about 50), according to the Soviet botanist Nikolai Vavilov, its center of origin would be the Chinese region, where the domestication of the apricot would have taken place. Other sources say that the apricot was first cultivated in India in about 3000 BC.

According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, world production of apricots in 2017 was 4.3 million tonnes, led by Turkey with 23% of the world total. Other major producers (in descending order) were Uzbekistan, Italy, Algeria, and Iran.

0DC678E2-8B09-4CE8-833C-C92DA8EBAF7002BC8A48-5DDB-4873-A966-310E5AF9D5A7A7E8B355-B37F-4AF5-92B6-9E4E46F50635E3011079-5790-45A8-94D2-C1DF8DADABE8CE32B13A-A363-4F98-9F8F-D2B205B8AC93EB8CB133-ECD1-44D1-A211-DC03039A8FA9BE18DFFD-E075-44D7-A340-BA79B7357E7B0D6AAF2E-6617-4AF2-844D-11D31CB386E1221F95F5-559E-4EF0-A799-2993779F45017BF1ED6B-DF44-40BD-AE3C-43EBFBCB759574A7CD27-0F8D-4857-9D98-7C65B4F12221D09BBBDF-8433-4585-9D73-74AABF208F0B